The Oakland/Kansas City/Philadelphia Athletics have had talented hitters throughout it's storied franchise history. Narrowing down the list of the top 10 hitters was an even more difficult task than the starting pitchers as there are a number of Hall of Famers who have played for the team. So, here's a look at the top 10 hitters in Athletics franchise history and two honorable mentions:


Eric Chavez was a solid hitter in his 13 years with the A's and the only reason why his numbers weren't better was because of injuries that plagued him his final few seasons with the team. When healthy he was a solid hitter who could find the gap and drive the ball out of the park. His best season came in 2001 when he hit .288, with 159 hits, 43 doubles, 32 home runs and 114 rbi, 41 walks a .338 obp, .540 slugging percentage, .878 OPS and 298 total bases.

His career totals were a .267 average, a .343 obp, 1,276 hits, 230 home runs and 787 rbi, 282 doubles, 20 triples, a .478 slugging percentage, a .821 OPS and 2,288 total bases.

 

Jose Canseco when he made contact the ball traveled a long way when he made contact, that is the key when he made contact. He didn't hit for a particularly high average in most of his nine seasons in a A's uniform. His best season came in 1988 which is the year hewon the American League MVP. He hit .307 with a .391 obp, had 187 hits with 42 home runs while driving in 124 runs, to go along with 34 doubles, 78 walks, a .569 (led the AL), .959 OPS and 347 total bases.

 

10. Mark McGwire wasn't going to hit for a high average much like Canseco and just like him when he connected the ball was going to go a long way. He played 12 seasons in an A's uniform and there were injuries the kept his numbers from being better than they are and yet he is the franchise's leader in career home runs with 363, what keeps him ranked at no.10 is that he was an all or nothing type hitter.

His best season with the A's was his last full season with the team before being traded to St. Louis and that was in 1996 when he hit .312, with 52 home runs (led the AL) drove in 113 runs, had 132 hits, 21 doubles, 116 walks a .467 obp (led the AL), .730 slugging percentage (led AL), 1.198 OPS (led AL) and 309 total bases.

In his career with the Athletics he again hit 363 homeruns, drove in 941, had 1,157 hits, 195 doubles, five triples, 847 walks, a .260 average, a .380 obp, .551 slugging percentage, .931 OPS and 2,451 total bases.

Besides being the A's franchise leader in home runs he has the second best slugging percentage in a season as well as the second most home runs in a seson, third best season for OPS, third best in career slugging percentage, fourth in career OPS, rbi, extra base hits and walks, seventh in total bases for his career with the team and the 10th best season in extra base hits.

9. Reggie Jackson played in 10 seasons with the Athletics and is much like Canseco and McGwire all or nothing type hitters. His best season with the A's came in 1969 when he hit .275 with a .410 obp, had 151 hits, 36 doubles, 47 home runs, 118 rbi, 114 walks, a .608 slugging percentage (led AL), 1.018 OPS (led AL) and 334 total bases.

In the 10 seasons he played in he hit .262 with a .355 obp, with 1,228 hits, 269 home runs, 776 rbis, 234 doubles, 27 triples, 633 walks, a .496 slugging percentage, .851 OPS and 2,323 total bases.

He won the AL MVP in 1972 he also led the AL in home runs twice, slugging percentage three times and OPS twice. In franchise history he ranks third in total home runs, fifth best season home run wise, sixth in extra base hits, eighth in total bases and rbi, 10th in slugging percentage, plate appearances and OPS.

 

8. Jason Giambi was a complete hitter he was not the all or nothing type hitter he could easily take the pitch that was given to him and drive it to the opposite field for a base hit. He spent seven plus seasons with the A's and won a MVP and was the runner up in another season.

His best year was his MVP season which was in 2000 when he hit .333, with 43 homeruns, 137 rbi, 29 doubles, a triple, 137 walks, a .476 obp (led AL), a .647 slugging percentage, 1.123 OPS and 330 total bases.

For his career in an A's uniform he hit .300, with 198 homeruns, 715 rbi, with 1,100 hits, 241 doubles, seven triples, 636 walks, a opb of .406, a slugging percentage of .531, a .938 OPS and 1,949 total bases.

Giambi also led the AL in doubles once, walks twice, opb twice, slugging percentage once and OPS once. Ranks with the A's include first best season in obp, second best season in walks, third in OPS, fourth in slugging percentage and also fourth best season in doubles and OPS wise, sixth best season in slugging percentage, seventh all-time in obp and eighth best season in homeruns and in total homeruns.

 

7. Mickey Cochrane could just flat out hit and even if he didn't hit for a lot of power in his nine seasons with the A's he posted consistent numbers and were impressive for a catcher. His best season came in 1932 when he hit .293 with 23 homeruns, 112 rbi, with 152 hits, 35 doubles, four triples, a obp of .412, slugging percentage of .510, a OPS of .921 and had 221 total bases.

In the nine seasons with the A's he hit .312 with 1,317 hits, 108 homeruns, 680 rbi, 250 doubles, 59 triples, a .412 obp, a .490 slugging percentage, .902 OPS and 2,009 total bases.

He won a MVP Award in 1928 and also led the AL in obp once. Cochrane's ranking in Athletics history include fifth best obp, sixth best batting average and OPS, 10th in total hits and 10th best single season batting average and obp in a season.

 

6. Jimmy Dykes played 15 seasons in an A's uniform and put up tremendous numbers especially for the era he played in. His best season came in 1929 when he hit .327 with 13 home runs, 79 rbi, 34 doubles, six triples, 51 walks, a .412 obp, .539 slugging percentage, .950 OPS and 216 total bases.

For his career he hit .283 with a .365 obp, had 86 home runs, 365 doubles, 73 triples, 1,705 hits, 686 walks, a .411 slugging percentage, .776 OPS and 2,474 total bases. Dykes ranks first in doubles, third in plate appearances, at-bats and singles, fourth in hits, sixth in total bases, seventh in extra base hits and 10th in triples.

 

5. Home Run Baker didn't have a very long career with the Athletics, yet he definitely made his mark. He did not play in an era where the ball jumped out of the stadium yet in the seven years with the A's he led the league four times in home runs, two times in rbi, once in triples and yet didn't win a MVP award.

His best season came in 1912 when he hit 10 home runs, drove in 130 runs, hit .347, had 200 hits, 40 doubles, 21 triples, 50 walks, a obp of .404, a .541 slugging percentage, a .945 OPS and 312 total bases.

Career wise he hit .321 with a .375 obp, had 1,103 hits, 194 doubles, 88 triples, 48 home runs, 612 rbi, 266 walks, a .471 slugging percentage, a .845 OPS and 1,617 total bases. Baker ranks first in triples in a season, third in total triples and sixth in career batting average.

 

4. Bob Johnson is one of the most underrated players in Athletics history. He was a consistent slugger in his 10 seasons with the team and his best season came in 1939 when he hit .338 with 23 home runs, drove in 114, with 184 hits, 30 doubles, nine triples, 99 walks a .440 obp, a .553 slugging percentage, a .993 OPS and 301 total bases.

For his career with the Athletics he hit .298 with 1,617 hits, 252 homeruns, 1,040 rbi, 307 doubles, 72 triples, a obp of .395, a slugging percentage of .520, a .915 OPS and 2,824 total bases.

Johnson ranks second in total bases and times on base, third in rbi, extra base hits and walks, fourth in doubles, at-bats and plate appearances, fifth in hits, homer runs, slugging percentage and OPS and 10th in singles.

 

3. Al Simmons was a great hitter for the Athletics and easily could be considered the greatest in Athletics franchise history. He played in 12 seasons with the Athletics and his best season came in 1930 when he hit .381 (that's not even his best average in a season .392 was) with 211 hits, 36 home runs, 165 rbi, 41 doubles, 16 triples, 39 walks, a .423 obp, a .708 slugging percentage, 1.130 OPS and 392 total bases.

He twice led the league in at-bats, hits, batting average, total bases and once led the league in rbi. The amazing thing is he never won a MVP award for any of his outstanding years the closest he came was second in 1925.

Simmons career numbers with the A's a .356 batting average, 1,827 hits, 209 home runs, 1,178 rbi, 348 doubles, 98 triples, a .398 obp, .584 slugging percentage, a .983 OPS and 2,998 total bases.

He ranks first in runs batted in, career batting average and total bases, first in at-bats for a season, singles, extra base hits, and doubles, second best in average for a season and second in hits, doubles, triples, runs driven in during one season, career slugging percentage and OPS, third best season in extra base hits, slugging percentage wise and total bases, fourth in singles, fifth best season OPS wise and in triples, seventh in total home runs, times on base in career and in plate appearances in one season, eighth in total career at-bats and career plate appearances and ninth in obp

 

2. Rickey Henderson is the greatest leadoff hitter in Major League Baseball history and he spent 14 of his 25 seasons with the Athletics during his long successful career. His best season with the A's came in 1990 when he had 159 hits, 28 home runs, 61 rbi, 33 doubles, three triples, 97 walks, a .439 obp, .577 slugging percentage, 1.016 OPS (led AL) and 282 total bases. The 1990 season also saw him winning the AL MVP award.

For his career he had a batting average of .288, 1,768 hits, 167 home runs, 648 rbi, 289 doubles, 41 triples, 1,227 walks, a obp of .409, slugging percentage of .430, a .839 OPS and 2,640 total bases.

Henderson ranks first in walks and times on base, second in singles, at-bats and career plate appearances, third best season in obp and plate appearances and third in total hits, fourth in total bases and fourth best season in times on base, and sixth in career obp and doubles and eighth in extra base hits.

 

1. Jimmie Foxx is one of the greatest sluggers in MLB history and played 11 seasons with the Athletics before moving on to Boston for seven plus seasons, had a short stint with the Chicago Cubs and ended in his career with the Philadelphia Phillies.

His best season came in 1932 when he hit .364 with 58 home runs, 169 rbi, with 213 hits, 33 doubles, nine triples, 116 walks, a obp of .469, a .769 slugging percentage (led AL), a 1.218 OPS (led AL) and 438 total bases (led AL) and he did win the MVP for this incredible year and also the next season.

Foxx's career numbers with the A's were a .339 batting average, 1,492 hits, 302 home runs, 1,075 rbi, 257 doubles, 79 triples, 781 walks, a obp of .440, a slugging percentage of .640, 1.079 OPS and 2,813 total bases.

He also led the league three times in slugging percentage and OPS, twice led the league in home runs, rbi and total bases, once led the league in obp and won one batting title. His rankings include first in obp, slugging percentage and OPS and first best season in home runs, rbi, extra base hits, times on base, slugging percentage, total bases and OPS, second best career batting average, home runs, rbi and extra base hits, third best season in obp and third in total bases, fifth in times on base, sixth in triples, seventh in hits and walks, eighth best season in batting average and ninth best season in hits.

Original article found here